FAREWELL TO SEAMUS HEANEY

Swans at Lough Murree beside Flaggy Shore, Co.Clare Photo: © Michael Fisher

Swans at Lough Murree beside Flaggy Shore, Co.Clare Photo: © Michael Fisher

I began my daily blog on New Year’s Day with a report that included this picture of swans at Lough Murree, beside the Flaggy Shore at New Quay in the Burren area of County Clare. I had just completed the loop walk along the limestone rock of the shoreline, looking out at Galway Bay. It was a lovely day in the company of friends, having welcomed in the New Year in Kinvara.

'Curtain call' at the Lyric Theatre Belfast for the late Seamus Heaney Photo: ©  Michael Fisher

‘Curtain call’ at the Lyric Theatre Belfast for the late Seamus Heaney Photo: © Michael Fisher

Memories of that afternoon came flooding back as in front of a packed house at the Lyric Theatre in Belfast, the poet Damian Gorman read ‘Postscript’ from Seamus Heaney’s collection ‘The Spirit Level’ (published 1996, the year after he won the Nobel Prize in Literature). Jean Tubridy has reproduced it on her Social Bridge blog:-

Postscript

And some time make the time to drive out west

Into County Clare, along the Flaggy Shore,

In September or October, when the wind

And the light are working off each other

So that the ocean on one side is wild

With foam and glitter, and inland among stones

The surface of a slate-grey lake is lit

By the earthed lightning of a flock of swans,

Their feathers roughed and ruffling, white on white,

Their fully grown headstrong-looking heads

Tucked or cresting or busy underwater.

Useless to think you’ll park and capture it

More thoroughly. You are neither here nor there,

A hurry through which known and strange things pass

As big soft buffetings come at the car sideways

And catch the heart off guard and blow it open.

(from The Spirit Level

Seamus Heaney: Lyric Theatre

Seamus Heaney: Lyric Theatre

Heaney had been associated with the Lyric theatre since the days of Mary O’Malley and the literary periodical ‘Threshold‘ fifty years ago. He was present at the foundation stone laying ceremony in 1965 when the Lyric Players built their own theatre at Ridgeway Street, and recited a poem written especially for the occasion, Peter Street at Bankside. 44 years on in September 2009 a stanza from the poem was engraved on the threshold stone as the foundations were laid for the new Lyric Theatre. He said he was honoured and commented that “The  renovation of the Lyric Theatre is a reminder of the vital artistic  achievement in the past and the promise of ongoing creative vigour in  the future. The renewal of the fabric of the building stands for the  kind of social and psychic renewal that the entire community aspires to.  The Lyric has engaged with the life of its society and performed the  classic Shakespearean task to provide ‘the abstract and brief chronicles  of the time’.”

 It was therefore highly fitting that a special  commemoration of the life of Seamus Heaney was organised at short notice by the Lyric Theatre and the free tickets were snapped up quickly. Ten people including his friend and fellow poet Michael Longley took part in an hour-long celebration that included poems, stories and music.

With Ard-Mhéara Bhéal Feirste Máirtín Ó Muilleoir and  Mairead 7 Michéal Martin at Lyric Theatre

Michael Fisher with Ard-Mhéara Bhéal Feirste Máirtín Ó Muilleoir and Mairead and Michéal Martin at Lyric Theatre

The Nobel Laureate made his last public appearance in Belfast at the Lyric on 23rd April 2012 where he addressed a sold-out audience to mark the new building’s first anniversary. The theatre’s close association with Heaney is reflected throughout the new building which contains a bust of the poet by sculptor, Philip Flanagan and a Louis le Brocquy painting at the entrance steps.

Seamus Heaney: Louis le Brocquy at Lyric Theatre Belfast

Seamus Heaney: Louis le Brocquy at Lyric Theatre Belfast

Lyric Chairman Mark Carruthers paid tribute to the distinguished poet:-

“Seamus Heaney was a long-time friend and supporter of the Lyric Theatre and we are all therefore deeply saddened at his passing. He was a man of enormous talents – easily the greatest Irish poet since Yeats. His loss will be deeply felt beyond the arts world. As Lyric Chairman we would like to offer our sincere condolences to his wife Marie and family. He will be greatly missed.”

The funeral of Seamus Heaney takes place on Monday: 11:30am Requiem Mass at the Church of the Sacred Heart, Donnybrook in Dublin, followed by burial after 5pm in his native parish of Bellaghy, County Derry. Ar dheis Dé go raibh a hanam dílis.

Seamus Heaney Portrait: Colin Davidson Photo: Michael Fisher

Seamus Heaney Portrait: Colin Davidson Photo: Michael Fisher

EBAF: WOMAD MUSIC & ARTS

WOMAD Flags flying at Skainos Centre Photo: © Michael Fisher

WOMAD Flags flying at Skainos Centre Photo: © Michael Fisher

OK, first I had better explain all these acronyms. For the past few days my blogs have concentrated on EBAF, the East Belfast Arts Festival, which runs until Sunday (1st September) and is now in its second year. The Lord Mayor of Belfast Councillor Máirtín Ó Muilleoir paid tribute to the “hardworking committee at East Belfast Arts Fest” when he met them at Belmont Tower. On his twitter account @newbelfast he described their five day programme as “a magnificent event, lifting the entire city”.

Getting ready for the concert Photo: © Michael Fisher

Getting ready for the concert Photo: © Michael Fisher

WOMAD brought to the Skainos Centre (East Belfast Mission) on the Newtownards Road the World of Music, Arts and Dance (sorry, I couldn’t fit the dancers into the title!). It was founded by rock icon Peter Gabriel in 1982, when he envisaged a concert involving artists from Africa. Since then concerts have been held in over 20 countries in front of live audiences totalling over one million people. It is now officially recognised in the Guinness Book of Records as the world’s biggest international music festival.

WOMAD: World of Music Arts & Dance  Photo: © Michael Fisher

WOMAD: World of Music Arts & Dance Photo: © Michael Fisher

Beyond Skin are delivering an outreach programme using international music, arts and dance to bridge cultural relations and  promote cultural learning. The all day event ranged from Uganda Gaze Dance to South American Charango & Ukulele to Indian Warli Art displays.

Brazilian Dance at WOMAD  Photo: © Michael Fisher

Brazilian Dance at WOMAD Concert: Photo: © Michael Fisher

The outreach showcase culminated in a concert that brought a range of unique world culture never seen before in East Belfast.

WOMAD Concert: Photo © Michael Fisher

Brazilian Dance at WOMAD Concert: Photo © Michael Fisher

The event featured performances from two of the most exciting musicians to come out of Senegal in the last decade, Oumar Sow (best known lead guitarists with Youssou N’Dour) and Singer/Guitarist Laye Sow. Supported by guest artists and the Reggae & Ska group, Boss Sound Manifesto. The five are Marty Malone on drums, Kieran ( sauce) Mc Curry on Guitar, Máirtín Ó Briain on Bass, Brendy Mc Curry on organ and guitar and Cormac (Buzz) Ó Briain on vocals and tenor sax.

WOMAD Concert  Boss Sound Manifesto Reggae & Ska Band Photo: © Michael Fisher

WOMAD Concert Boss Sound Manifesto Reggae & Ska Band Photo: © Michael Fisher

WOMAD Arts Music & Dance Photo © Michael Fisher

WOMAD Arts Music & Dance Photo © Michael Fisher

The event was part funded by Belfast City Council’s Creative Legacies project supported under the Belfast PEACE III Plan by the European Union’s European Regional Development Fund through the PEACE III Programme and East Belfast District Policing & Community Safety Partnership.  EU flag2colors

EBAF: GAP IN THE HEDGE

Stephen Hall tunes his guitar Photo: © Michael Fisher

Stephen Hall tunes his guitar Photo: © Michael Fisher

If you have heard ‘The Wee Wee Man‘ from County Antrim on the radio, you would have enjoyed the ‘Gap in the Hedge’ night at the East Belfast Arts Festival. Before I go any further I should explain to readers outside Ulster that ‘wee’ is merely local dialect for small and a common expression in this part of the island of Ireland and in Scotland. Stephen Hall who wrote the song is a graphic designer who now devotes his time to storytelling and songwriting. He has written, illustrated and published popular books that look at the theme of identity through popular myth, using accessible styles and writing techniques to introduce these works to a broader audience.

Randall Stephen Hall Photo: © Michael Fisher

Randall Stephen Hall Photo: © Michael Fisher

Stephen sometimes uses a Kenyan drum to accompany his songs. The programme told us that he has a deep interest in how we see ourselves as a community in Northern Ireland. I notice that one of the songs on his album, released in 2010, is called The Reiver and the Gael, which refers to the period before Plantation.

Randall Stephen Hall Photo: © Michael Fisher

Randall Stephen Hall Photo: © Michael Fisher

One review remarked on the “melodic mandolin and catchy chorus” of that particular track. As John Baucher explained in that article in culturenorthernireland.org:-

“What Hall is doing, in my view, is asking people to look beyond the obvious and politicised traditions by arguing that we are a mix of the old and new. We are of a mongrel bloodline: a hotchpotch of Irish, Scottish, Welsh and English, to name a few of the obvious strands of DNA flowing here in Northern Ireland. As Hall states in the musical poem ‘The Lang Staine’: ‘So culture vultures listen. Listen long and hard. Ulster Scots a hybrid. Nae dull aul lump of lard. A shiny shiny dappled thing. A mongrel through and through’. “

The album is “an inventive mixture of poetry and song in the Ulster-Scots Irish tradition”. The CD with 21 tracks of songs and poems was recorded in a work East room at the top of Stephen’s house, his ‘moon shed’, and was launched at The Black Box in Belfast in September 2010. Further details are available on BBC Northern Ireland’s Ulster-Scots page.

https://myspace.com/randallstephenhall/music/song/the-wee-wee-man-71577431-78868353  RSH-Cover-_thumb

EBAF: ‘THOU SHALT NOT KILL’

Post-performance discussion with actors Photo: © Michael Fisher

Post-performance discussion with actors Photo: © Michael Fisher

Sectarianism, racism and homophobia are alive and well in our schools in Northern Ireland. That’s the view of a former teacher Jim Arbuckle from London/derry, who works as a Good Relations Facilitator alongside the Smashing Times Theatre Company, who performed tonight in the East Belfast Arts Festival.

Jim Arbuckle

Jim Arbuckle

The group which has carried out a lot of reconciliation work in border areas through storytelling and drama staged a performance of Thou Shalt not Kill  tonight in the BMC campus at Tower Street, off the Newtownards Road. For the second night running I was in a part of Belfast I would not usually visit at night. The College building is beside a flashpoint area at the Short Strand, where there have been disturbances in the past and where a police car kept watch in case of trouble. A block away is a road junction where I remember a man was shot dead eight years ago (and seven years after the Good Friday agreement) by the UVF during a loyalist paramilitary feud.

Fiona Bawn-Thompson, Smashing Times Theatre Company Photo: © Michael Fisher

Fiona Bawn-Thompson, Smashing Times Theatre Company Photo: © Michael Fisher

I thought of those times as I watched the performance. It began with Fiona Bawn-Thompson portraying in dance and mime a ghost of the past. Dressed in white. she appeared like a Greek muse in an Athenian tragedy. Her role at the start, in the middle between the two monolgues and at the end was a useful device in tying the two stories together, around a wreath of red roses. Fiona is a dance teacher and has used her skills to good effect in facilitating specialist workshops on racism, sectarianism and childrens’ rights.

Cathy White Smashing Times Theatre Company Photo: © Michael Fisher

Cathy White Smashing Times Theatre Company Photo: © Michael Fisher

The two other members of the cast gave very strong performances telling stories of two different victims of the ‘troubles’, one on the Protestant/loyalist side from Belfast which was counterbalanced with the story of a former republican paramilitary from Strabane. Cathy White is from Belfast but is living in Dublin and has worked for the Abbey Theatre and the Lyric. You might have seen her in the TG4 and BBC NI series Scúp, an eight part drama series by Colin Bateman, set in a Belfast newspaper.

Cathy plays the role of Alice Thompson from a loyalist area in Belfast. Alice worked in a flower shop on the Lisburn Road from the age of 17 and soon afterwards met a young Catholic lad Eamonn, who delivered flowers including red roses for her on Valentine’s Day. They started going out with each other, but her family was then threatened by loyalist paramilitaries who sent her a bullet in the post with her boyfriend’s name written on a note. Alice attempted to get the threat removed by going to a paramilitary in her area ‘Robbie McFarlane’. His response was that by going out with a Catholic, she was spitting on the graves of his colleagues and other Protestants who had been killed by the IRA.

It was a few months later as they began to plan a low-key wedding that her fiancé Eamonn was shot dead as he made a delivery to a shop on the Holywood Road. As two RUC members brought her the news, Alice described how the earth had opened up and swallowed her. She was wrapped in a comfort blanket of love by family and friends yet she could not be comforted.  There were more twists in the story before the end.

Adam Traynor Smashing Times Theatre Company Photo: © Michael Fisher

Adam Traynor Smashing Times Theatre Company Photo: © Michael Fisher

Dubliner Adam Traynor played the role of Tom Mulhern, a republican from Strabane who had been a member of a paramilitary group and had been involved in attacks on the RUC and planting a bomb in Magherafelt in which a child died. He was on the run in Donegal and could not cross the border when his father died of cancer, in case he was detained at a checkpoint in the North. This was another very moving story and the topic of racism was also subtly introduced through the person of Audrey, a black woman fro Chicago who lived in Letterkenny. The story was also quite topical as it included a mention of Castlederg, where a republican march earlier this month to commemorate two IRA bombers led to protests by relatives of security force members and others killed by the IRA.

Thou Shalt Not Kill was commissioned by Smashing Times Theatre Company. It is presented in the form of ‘living theatre’ installations to explore themes of conflict and trauma. Using the body as a site of performance, memory and emotion and centering on peoples’ experience of living in Northern Ireland, ‘Thou Shalt not Kill’ imagines the future through a remembrance of things past and explores themes of trauma, conflict, forgiveness and moving forward.

  • Created by Mary Moynihan
  • Written by Paul Kennedy
  • Performed by Fiona Thompson, Adam Traynor and Cathy White
  • Directed by Mary Moynihan and Bairbre Ni Chaoimh

    Discussion Panel

    Discussion Panel

As part of The Memory Project, Smashing Times Theatre Company is making a television documentary showing how the creative processes of drama and theatre can be used to explore memories and experiences of conflict and to promote peace and non-violence. This project is run by Smashing Times Theatre Company in partnership with Corrymeela Community and in association with CAIN (Conflict Archive on the Internet) and the University of Ulster INCORE International Conflict Research Institute. The project is funded through the EU’s PEACE III Programme, managed by the Special EU Programmes Body.  EU flag2colors

EBAF: GAEILGE/IRISH IN EAST BELFAST

Linda Ervine at East Belfast Arts Festival Photo: © Michael Fisher

Linda Ervine at East Belfast Arts Festival Photo: © Michael Fisher

‘Fáilte roimh’ were the Irish words of welcome Linda Ervine used at the start of her interesting talk in the heart of loyalist East Belfast. The venue was the ‘Skainos’ centre on the Lower Newtownards Road. The name comes from the Greek word for tent or dwelling. Skainos speaks of the importance of practical engagement with a community by figuratively pitching a tent in its midst, and it hints at the notion of hospitality and the extended family. The East Belfast Mission (Methodist church) has been closely involved with the development of this cross-community facility.

Attentive audience for Linda Ervine Photo: © Michael Fisher

Attentive audience for Linda Ervine Photo: © Michael Fisher

This area is known as Ballymacarrett. As Linda points out, Irish names are all around. It comes from Baile Mhic Gearóid meaning “MacGearóid’s settlement”. Linda started her ‘turas’ meaning journey or pilgrimage or even tour about the Irish language a few years ago after the death of her brother-in-law David Ervine, former leader of the Progressive Unionist Party who had served time for a UVF-related offence in the Maze prison, where he came under the influence of Gusty Spence. Gusty had an interest in the Irish language (Gaeilge) and wore a silver fainne in his buttonhole, awarded to Irish speakers.

That story was one of the many surprises Linda had for most of her audience. She went on to explain how she had done some research on David’s family in the 1911 Census. There she discovered his grandfather John Ervine, then aged 36, living at Frome Street off the Newtownards Road and not far from the Skainos centre. He was head of the family at the time and he and the rest of them were entered as being able to speak Irish and English, as well as being able to read and write. Update: it has been pointed out that if you look closely at the actual census record by enlarging it, there is a fine line drawn through the words ‘Irish & English’ by the census enumerator, in the entry for the Ervine family and those in the same street.

Explaining the derivation of Rathcoole (loyalist estate): Ráth Cúile: nook of the ringfort

Explaining the derivation of Rathcoole (loyalist estate): Ráth Cúile: nook of the ringfort

Linda is Irish Language Development Officer for East Belfast and is based at the Skainos Centre. She  started learning Irish two years ago as part of a cross-community project with women from the nearby nationalist Short Strand. Now she runs five classes a week for beginners as well as lower and upper intermediate level, delivered by three specialist teachers. It is supported by Foras na Gaeilge, and there is a growing demand for more. Linda is passionate about helping Protestants, unionists and loyalists to dis

Linda Ervine recommends books by the Ultach Trust

Linda Ervine recommends books by the Ultach Trust

Linda has found much useful background material in the publications of the Ultach Trust, such as ‘A History of Protestant Irish Speakers’. She referred to the Reverend John Feeley, a Wesleyan preacher who went round the country on horseback, died in Holywood in 1860 and who is buried at a church on the Newtownards Road:-

The foremost Methodist preacher in Irish was Gideon Ousely (1762-1839) from Sligo, who at the height of his powers travelled 4,000 miles a year, preaching about 20 times a week. He was accompanied by John Feely (Seán Ó Fithcheallaigh), who had trained to be a Catholic priest, and thus guaranteed curiosity wherever he appeared. Together they were known as the ‘black caps’ because of their close-fitting skull caps designed to protect their heads from stones; Ousely preferred to stand in front of apothecaries’ windows to deter missiles (Hempton and Hill 1992: 41). Ousely’s strange clothes, comical leer (the result of a shooting accident), and habit of ringing a bell to announce his arrival also ensured large audiences“.

Noel McGee as Robert McAdam Photo: Aisling Ghéar

Noel McGee as Robert McAdam Photo: Aisling Ghéar

Linda mentioned other leading Irish speakers in the 19th Century who were Protestants: Robert McAdam a Presbyterian who is remembered in the former Presbyterian Church on the Falls Road in West Belfast, now known as the Cultúrlann McAdam Ó Fiaich. His story ‘SEO Robert: The Search for Robert McAdam’ will be presented by the Aisling Ghéar theatre company on Sunday evening at the BMC Tower Street campus as part of the East Belfast festival at 7:30pm. Admission £5. It is a one-man show by Noel McGee directed by Bríd Ó Gallchoir and is mainly in English, with some Irish which is translated by the performer. McAdam was involved in setting up a library, a harp society, a museum and a literary society. He designed and mended steam turbines, made the windows for the Pasha’s Palace in Cairo and still found time to compose music and amass one of the largest collections of Irish cultural treasures on the island.

Having given her audience an interesting introduction to the use of Irish in Northern Ireland where 95% of placenames are derived from Gaeilge, Linda ended on an amusing note. For those who seek to use the republican slogan “Tiocfaidh ár lá”, or “our day will come”, there should be one response: “Ní ghéillfimid”, meaning we will not yield, or in the local version as demonstrated in this final slide featuring senior DUP and Sinn Féin figures,”No surrender!”.

How to say "No Surrender" in Irish!

How to say “No Surrender” in Irish!

MODEL RAILWAYS

Southern Railway Bulleid Q1-class No.C1 (33001) at National Railway Museum, York Photo: © Michael Fisher

Southern Railway Bulleid Q1-class No.C1 (33001) at National Railway Museum, York Photo: © Michael Fisher

My interest in trains is largely owing to this locomotive: a Southern Railway Bulleid Q1-class No. C1 (33001). Known by their nick-name of Charlies or ‘Coffee Pots’, this class was designed as a wartime economy locomotive by Oliver Bulleid, making use of already existing patterns for many of their parts, as goods locomotives intended only for a short life. Although the same weight as the Q-class, their predecessors, they were 50 per-cent more powerful, and proved to be fine machines, lasting much longer than originally intended. Considered ugly by some, they are very popular with enthusiasts. The locomotive had two cylinders with Stephenson link outside admission piston valves, and was provided with a five-nozzle blast-pipe. It represents the final version of the goods 0-6-0 development on the Southern Railway (and for that matter, in the world) which can be traced through the examples preserved on the Bluebell Railway of the SER “O1”, through the SECR “C” and SR “Q” classes.

Bulleid Q1-class No.C1 (33001) on Bluebell Railway Photo: © Mike Esau

Bulleid Q1-class No.C1 (33001) on Bluebell Railway Photo: © Mike Esau

Withdrawals began in 1963, during the implementation of the British Rail modernisation plan, which saw the end of steam operations on Britain’s railways, the last example of the Q1 class being withdrawn in 1966. C1 is the sole survivor and was restored to working order by the Bluebell Railway in Sussex on two separate occasions under successive agreements with the National Railway Museum in York, where it is now on display and where I was delighted to come across it during a visit in June.

Model Railway Exhibition Dún Laoghaire Poster

Model Railway Exhibition Dún Laoghaire

Given my interest in railways which was developed at an early age in London, it was only natural that when I saw a poster for a model railway exhibition in Dún Laoghaire at the weekend that I should explore what was on display in the concourse of County Hall. There were some very interesting layouts including one made from Lego bricks.

Visitors were asked by the Model Railway Society of Ireland to vote for their favourite display. I’m not sure who won top prize. But my vote went to stand number five, where onlookers were given a flavour of what O’Connell Street, the main thoroughfare of Dublin, looked like sixty or more years ago in the 1940s.

Nelson Pillar was the transport hub and trams used to set off from here to various parts of the city. The layout included cars, vans, pedestrians and even cyclists. To get an idea of the display I recommend this short vimeo by Brian Durcan.  The High Definition version is available here. Altogether there were fifteen layouts on show, including some from Northern Ireland.

O'Connell Street Layout Photo: © Michael Fisher

O’Connell Street Layout Photo: © Michael Fisher

O’Connell  Street: This layout is a 4mm scale (1:76) representation of the capital’s main street and its trams as it was in the last year  of tramway operated in 1949. The buildings on the west side of  the street were modelled using ordnance survey maps and photographs of the period. The civic monuments including the Nelson Pillar grace the centre of  the street. Many figures of people in  the  model including cyclists, horse  transport and “internal combustion engine vehicles” sharing space with working trams, busses and trucks.

Castlefinn Photo: © Michael Fisher

Castlefinn Photo: © Michael Fisher

Castlefinn:  Built  by one of the MRSI members this is a OO9 gauge layout of Castlefinn station in County Donegal, on the  Donegal narrow  gauge railway  line. It shows Castlefinn as it would be today if it were reopened by a  preservation  society. The railcar is similar to one operated by the Clogher Valley Railway. At the exhibition I was able to purchase a copy of Edward Patterson’s book on the CVR.

Letterkenny Station: Donegal Railway Heritage Photo: © Michael Fisher

Letterkenny Station: Donegal Railway Heritage Centre Photo: © Michael Fisher

Other Layouts/Displays: Letterkenny Station  – Donegal Railway Heritage Centre. For details of their museum at the old station house in Donegal town, see here.

TYDAVNET SHOW

Tydavnet Show Photo: © Michael Fisher

Tydavnet Show Photo: © Michael Fisher

Two months ago I wrote about the preparations for Virginia Show (Cavan) and also the Tydavnet Show in County Monaghan. Junior Agriculture Minister Tom Hayes TD praised the wonderful work and commitment of the various show committees who give their services to the community every year on a voluntary basis. The full extent of the efforts of the show committee became apparent at the showgrounds at Drumshevra between Tydavnet and Scotstown on Saturday 17th August.

Tydavnet Show President Henry Blackburn presents the cups Photo: © Michael Fisher

Tydavnet Show President Henry Blackburn presents the cups Photo: © Michael Fisher

After an early shower, the rain stayed off until the end, when the cups were being presented to prizewinners by the show President, Henry Blackburn. In just over a fortnight’s time, Henry will be losing his beloved tresses in a sponsored headshave in aid of Monaghan Cancer Treatment Support. The barber will be in place at Tydavnet community centre on Friday 13th (September) but hopefully Henry will not be superstitious!

Tydavnet Show Vice-Treasurer George McCarron Photo: © Michael Fisher

Tydavnet Show Vice-Treasurer George McCarron Photo: © Michael Fisher

One of the first volunteers I met at the showgrounds was my wife’s cousin George McCarron, a member of the Irish Farmers Association. This was the 62nd annual show and from what I saw of the exhibits, it was another great success.

Cart at Tydavnet Show Photo: © Michael Fisher

Cart at Tydavnet Show Photo: © Michael Fisher

Monaghan Vintage Club brought a number of exhibits to the show, including an old thresher.

Monaghan Vintage Club Thresher at Tydavnet Show Photo: © Michael Fisher

Monaghan Vintage Club Thresher at Tydavnet Show Photo: © Michael Fisher